Online Events

Due to time zones, events presented by American speakers will be spread over more days, and will take place in the afternoon from 2 pm to 6 pm Italian time

Implementing Data Fabric, Mesh, or Lakehouse

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

May 23 - May 24, 2022

By: Barry Devlin

Understanding DataOps to Deliver Analytics Better and Faster

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

May 25, 2022

By: John O'Brien

Modern Application Architectures

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

May 26 - May 27, 2022

By: Jesse Anderson

Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Data Management

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

May 30 - May 31, 2022

By: Derek Strauss

Pre-Project Problem Analysis

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

Jun 06 - Jun 07, 2022

By: Adrian Reed

Building a Business-Driven Roadmap for Modern Cloud Data Architecture

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

Jun 08, 2022

By: John O'Brien

Data Virtualization: Technology and Use Cases

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

Jun 09 - Jun 10, 2022

By: Rick van der Lans

Data Management Fundamentals with CDMP Certification

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

Jun 13 - Jun 15, 2022

By: Christopher Bradley

Data Management Fundamentals

ONLINE LIVE STREAMING

Jun 13 - Jun 15, 2022

By: Christopher Bradley

Free article of the month

Adrian_Reed
May 2022

Upcoming events by this speaker:

Jun 6 – Jun 7, 2022:
Pre-Project Problem Analysis

Look Before You Leap: Pre-Project Problem Analysis: A Thin Slice Of The “Why, What & How”

A common challenge that faces change practitioners is the situation where a group of stakeholders decide on a solution early. There is nothing inherently wrong with this, the issue arises when a solution is seized upon before there’s a clear understanding of the outcomes that are being sought, and the problems or opportunities that are being addressed. In that situation there can be a real danger that each stakeholder has a slightly different expectation on what the chosen ‘solution’ will do and how it will benefit them. If these expectations aren’t clearly articulated then situations can emerge where people agree on the surface level but have vastly different underlying views. It can also lead to situations where the supposed “solution” actually makes things worse, or simply displaces the problem to somewhere else in the organisation.

Imagine a group of stakeholders who have decided that they want a new CRM system. It would be completely possible to launch a project to implement exactly what they’ve asked for (and migrate the existing data), but if questions weren’t asked about why they wanted a new system in the first place we might find that it doesn’t have the effect they were hoping for. Imagine a stakeholder says:

“Ah, I’m glad you asked me this! The reason we want a new CRM package is because our field sales team just won’t use our existing one. We’ve heard (XYZ CRM System) is really popular, so we thought we’d give that a go”

Clearly this is a provocative example, but it illustrates the fallacy of going ahead without understanding “the why”. In fact, we would certainly want to probe further, and ask why the sales team don’t use the existing system…. Perhaps it’s because the data is poor? Maybe they are field based, and it doesn’t work well on their mobile devices? Or maybe it’s just because they don’t see the value in using it at all (if that’s the case then a new system is unlikely to solve the problem!).

                                                                                                                               Continue to read…

Subscribe to our newsletter